DM of the Rings LXIX:
New Dimensions in Storage

By Shamus
on Feb 28, 2007
Filed under:
DM of the Rings

Aragorn uses his pack.

Aragorn uses his pack.

Aragorn uses his pack.

Observing that the “pack” in D&D is a much-abused simplification is not going to result in forehead-slapping revelations on the part of anyone who has played the game. We know this, already.

Still, it is amusing to see how eagerly these compromises are embraced. Even “hardcore” gamers are happy to treat the average knapsack as a soundproof bag which will distribute the weight of the contents evenly over the body of the wearer. I guess it’s good that geeks don’t go outside very often, or someone would notice this and come up with a set of complex knapsack simulation rules that would make GURPS look like checkers.

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  1. ComicallyMacabre says:

    Being a total Whovian as well as a Tolkien nerd, this fills me with so much happiness. . . Seriously. ; w;

  2. Owen says:

    If you want complicated knapsack rules, have a look at Aftermath – or as I call it, how to find bandages in four hundred and seventeen easy steps.

    Yusof of the previous example is in Detailed
    Action Time and finds that he needs some of his
    medical supplies. With his Deftness Group of 2, he
    will have two Actions per Combat Turn. He will
    spend the first turn taking off his pack, since it
    requires two Actions to do so. The backpack is held
    closed by two buckles so it will take Yusof another
    turn to open the pack. Because all the items in the
    pack are in separate bags, the Gamesmaster rules
    that there are 4 “things” in the pack. The
    Gamesmaster rolls 104 (Roll 1 D6 and ignore results
    over 4 ) and the result is 3. Since Yusof’s Deftness
    Group is 3. he willget the right bag on the first action
    of sorting. Because there are two bandages to each
    unit of supplies. there is a 1 in 3 chance that each
    “thing” gone through in the small bag will be a unit
    of supplies. Yusof can check up to 3 “things” per
    Action. The Gamesmaster starts rolling lD3 for
    each item sorted. The second die roll is a 1 so the
    “thing” is a unit of supplies. The total number of
    Actions would be six. Yusof is in a hurry so the
    player elects to attempt a Saving Throw to cut the
    time. The Gamesmaster rolls 1020. The die result
    falls in Yusof’s Ability Saving Throw range. This
    means that the time in terms of numbers of Actions
    will be cut in half, to three. The Gamesmaster will
    announce that Yusof has a unit of supplies in his
    hands at the end of the third Action from the time
    that the player announced that Yusof was beginning
    the attempt. If interrupted, Yusof would have to pick
    up the process again from where he left off. A new
    calculation of the time reauired should be made. (apologies for the bad OCR’ing)

  3. […] An example of why you don’t want too much realism in a game […]

  4. […] saw this and had to share it. It is from this site, http://www.shamusyoung.com/twentysidedtale/?p=984. (Caution: There is some bad language on some […]

  5. Jennifer says:

    I love this! Doctor Who references are very appreciated and make this even funnier-who new that was possible?

    I’m also being slowly convinced to play D&D, but I have no one to play with me.

  6. […] D&D My wife has been reading DM of the Rings the last few days and today she linked me this expository on packs. I found it amusing. Reply With […]

  7. […] walk down crowded streets and fit through doorways? What you are using isn’t a backpack, its an invisible leather tardis. Steve can carry 3392m3 of material in his pockets, with a further 64m3 in his hand (hand, […]

  8. WickedPrince says:

    OMG: you made a GURPS reference, had to laugh at that one especially hard. I loved that system when it came out because finally I could craft my fantasy races the way I wanted them and be able to craft new ones that would all be reasonably balanced and have their own unique traits. Then I got bogged down in all the minutia. All the books you buy mostly because they have a rework of how some silly rule works that you almost never use, but seems cooler than the clunky rule in the core book – and which you can NEVER find when you need it. :D

  9. always bigger on the inside…………

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4 Trackbacks

  1. […] An example of why you don’t want too much realism in a game […]

  2. By LOL « MythGal's Blog on Thu Feb 9, 2012 at 9:38 pm

    […] saw this and had to share it. It is from this site, http://www.shamusyoung.com/twentysidedtale/?p=984. (Caution: There is some bad language on some […]

  3. By D&D - Page 82 on Thu Jun 28, 2012 at 5:24 pm

    […] D&D My wife has been reading DM of the Rings the last few days and today she linked me this expository on packs. I found it amusing. Reply With […]

  4. […] walk down crowded streets and fit through doorways? What you are using isn’t a backpack, its an invisible leather tardis. Steve can carry 3392m3 of material in his pockets, with a further 64m3 in his hand (hand, […]

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